July 15th is National I Love Horses Day (Or, Actually, I- Love-One-Particular-Horse- Day)

I didn’t like horses as a child. In fact, I didn’t particularly like them as an adult. However, I did enjoy touring the countryside and riding a horse was much easier than hiking it all. When I moved to Tucson, I liked riding though the Sonoran Desert, but I found that the stirrups hurt my aged knees.

A couple of my equestrian friends suggested I learn to ride bareback, which is how I met Button, a Missouri Fox-Trotter, who was one of my lesson horses. She had started her own lessons a month before I did, so we learned together.

photo taken from atop Button, a Missouri Fox-Trotter
Riding in the desert atop Button, the horse I do love

Little did I know that I would ever own a horse of my own. Little did I know that three years later, I would own Button! Up until the night before I was asked if I wanted her, I would have told you, no way was I ever going to have a horse. But Button chose me to be her human and I chose her to be my horse.

Even though I don’t love all horses, I do love this one particular horse, on National I Love Horses Day.

photo of author Elaine Powers with Button, a missiouri fox-trotter
Me, with my favorite horse!

Who knows? Button just may inspire me to write a book about her one day. But, in the meantime, I hope you’ll check out some of the fun science books for kids that I’ve written. Who say science has to be boring? Not me!

And, we’re all looking for ways to learn and grow at home now. Check out the incredible science workbooks at Lyric Power Publishing. They’re fun, educational, economical and you buy a workbook once and print it as many times as you’d like. Click on the image below to see all of them.

Collage of Science Education Workbooks
Click on Workbooks to see all 23 workbooks, making science education fun!

Comfortable in Her Own Skin

There’s a saying about being comfortable in one’s own on skin.  Recently, this saying took on a new meaning for me.  Last year, I became the delighted owner of a Missouri Fox Trotter named Button.  She was born in Missouri, so every winter she grows a coat worthy of the cold cruel Midwest winter winds; she is quite cozy here in Tucson’s cool winter weather.

Button, before her stylist arrived

Come spring, Button would shed the massive amount of hair down to her more comfortable summer thin coat.  This spring, however, she didn’t shed sufficiently. Temperatures were in the 80s with 90s being forecast. Our workouts left her “sopping” wet with sweat.  Action needed to be taken.

I noticed that one of the other horses had been shaved by a local groomer.  She’d done a lovely job, leaving the horse’s coat smooth. No razor ridges like I would create. I gave her a call, scheduled Button’s hair appointment and off the thick winter coat came. It was like watching a sheep being sheared! I expected her to be a bright shiny copper penny color underneath but she looks more bronze to me. She is now much more comfortable temperature-wise, but I wondered if she would miss her hair.

After a day of multiple rolls in the dirt, I think Button is now truly comfortable in her own skin.

And now, being comfortable in my own skin, it’s back to to stories I go! To see my science-based and fun adventure tales and rhyming stories, please go to the My Books page.

A collage of book covers indicating the categories of books at elaineapowers.com
My Books By Category

Pet Peeves

I love having animals in my life.  Over the years, they’ve mostly been reptiles and lately, if you’ve been following my story, there’s a horse tale in it. 

If we accept responsibility for an animal, we are responsible for its welfare, even if we have to sacrifice for it. This has come up in the care of my horse.  She developed chronic sinusitis as a result of an abscessed tooth. Every month, the equine dentist comes out to do the next step in her care.  Of course, this specialist’s care costs money. But I took responsibility for her life, so I owe Button the best care I can provide. Apparently, not all horse owners feel the same way, which is very sad to me. There are several famous quotes about judging a person by the way he cares for his fellow animals.

I owe her my best care.

The impetus for this post was a statement in a local neighborhood chat room.  The person posting had observed a bobcat enjoying its dinner.  A wonderful sight to see in the limited wilderness remaining in the Sonoran Desert. However, the poster concluded that the bobcat’s only purpose was as a threat to local dogs and cats. The bobcat was most likely eating a rabbit – it’s been a good year for rabbits. Of course, the danger from coyotes was included in the post.   

I disagree that local wildlife is the threat to domestic companion animals. The problem is people not taking proper care of their pets. When I let my reptiles out in the backyard, I stay with them. We have birds of prey in the area that could carry off an iguana. The bobcats could enjoy a nice turtle or tortoise meal—but it’s not on them. It’s my job as their human companion to ensure their safety in the environment I place them.

Along with watching out for our dogs and pets, I also feel it is our duty to ensure that our pets don’t harm the local wildlife. Billions of birds are killed each year by cats. Please keep your cats inside, where they are safe and healthy, or use a leash. Many people love to feed the birds in their yards but are unable to enjoy them due to a cat(s). I run into cat predation in my iguana conservation work. Too many are the years we don’t see any juvenile iguanas because they’ve all been killed by domestic pets that the iguanas didn’t recognize as predators. Dogs are equally dangerous when not properly supervised.

People, please protect and control your furry family members. We can all thrive together in this world.

Remember, if the local bobcat or coyote gets your family member, it is not the predator’s fault.  It’s yours.  Protect your pet!

How Do You Take a Selfie with a Horse?

Have you ever tried to take a selfie with a horse? I recently attempted to take one with my mare, Button.  Horse noses are really loooong–my arms, not so much.

Here is a recent endeavor.

You’re too close to the phone, Button. Hey, look the OTHER way, please!  (Oh, and block out the sun, too).

Better, but you forgot to block the sun.

Button and me in the Sonoran Desert.

I think we’ve got this!

Button and I run into a LOT of rocks on our morning rides. I’ll bet you do, too! This workbook is filled with fun activity sheets about rocks. Learning while having fun is a great way to spend some time!

See a Video about this Workbook at Curtis Curly-tail Speaks on You Tube!