One Thousand Pounds of the Unexpected!

One year ago today my life changed significantly.

Growing up, and as an adult, I’ve had only reptiles as companion animals. I never wanted a mammal. Okay, I did think about getting a hedgehog at one point, but they are nocturnal and I’m definitely a diurnal type of person. After I retired from my work as a biologist, I began horseback riding lessons so I’d be more comfortable with the stirrups on commercial trail rides.

Even though I enjoyed my lessons with my trainer, Tali, I wasn’t interested in leasing a horse and, of course, I had absolutely no interest in owning a horse. For my lessons, I alternated between Lady, an easygoing horse, and Button, who was stubborn and outspoken about her fears.

Despite Button being a challenge, I sought out every opportunity to ride her. As the saying goes, “calm seas do not a skilled sailor make.” Button provided me with the opportunity to improve my riding ability. Having spent many years wrestling large iguanas like Rango pictured below, I could be stubborn myself. If I was paying to ride Button, we were going to do what I wanted to, whether she agreed or not.

elaine a powers with rhino iguana rango
Here I am with Rhino Iguana Rango. Isn’t she a beauty? We’re both pretty good wrestlers.

Somewhere along the way, Button grew to like me. Well–she claimed me as hers. It is a very special feeling when another being wants you around. One night, completely unexpectedly, I decided that if for some reason Button ever needed a new home, I’d be willing to take her. The next morning Tali asked me if I was interested in owning Button!

A couple of months later, I moved Button to a stable near my house. Now every day, just like I do with my house reptiles, I spend time with this very special horse. We work on our skills and take trail rides in the wash.

It’s been an eventful year. I’ve learned a lot about horses, about Button and about myself. I have found an unexpected peace when I am with her. Maybe it’s because you have to be focused when hanging out with a thousand-pound, independently-minded creature.

photo of the back of a horse's head
My favorite view!

Happy Anniversary to my quite large mammalian buddy, Button!

Selfie of Elaine Powers with her horse Button
Have you ever tried to take a ‘selfie’ with a horse?

Note: Though I’ve yet to write a tale about horses (sorry, Button!), I’ve weaved science into adventure tales, hoping to make science education fun, which kids seem to really enjoy. (Why not make science fun?)

children's book cover about Curtis Curly-tail lizard and a hurricane in the Bahamas
In this fourth story of the series, Curtis joins Allison Andros Iguana to warn the iguanas of Beach Cay about the impending hurricane. Low lying areas are particularly vulnerable to the storm surges, high rainfall and powerful winds of hurricanes. Small islands or cays here in the Bahamas can be completely washed over. Beach Cay, the setting of Curtis Curly-tail is Blown Away, has entire populations of endemic animals, such as the iguanas like Allison. One powerful hurricane could wipe out her entire species.

Please see the Curtis Curly-tail Adventure Series here and the Lime Lizard Lads’ Adventures here.

book covers lime lizard lads

Gene and Bony, the Lime Lizard Lads, love exploring their island home! Come along on their adventures today!

Workbooks and activity sheets to supplement science education like the one below are also available at Lyric Power Publishing LLC/Workbooks.


image of a book cover, My Book About Bats and Rats

47 pages of captivating activities that kids from kindergarten through 3rd grade are certain to enjoy! Includes spelling pages, two Venn-Diagram activities: bats vs. parrots, and bats vs. rats; math pages, reading comprehension pages for both bats and rats; a teacher-driven felt board activity; rhyming words, less than-greater than coloring sheet; two word searches, and MORE! Students will gain a deeper understanding of the Caribbean Fruit Bat and the rats that live on Cayman Brac and how they affect the ecology.

September 4 is National Wildlife Day

This guy, Roadrunner Geococcyx californianus, and his species inspired my book, Don’t Make Me Fly!

September 4 is National Wildlife Day.  As a biologist, I love wildlife, whether it is in my backyard or at some distant exotic location. Wildlife Day was established to remind us about endangered animals, locally and around the world.

This is also the day to recognize the work being done on behalf of these animals, both in preservation and education about them. I do my part for conservation through my volunteering as a citizen scientist, talks I give, the books I write about animals, and supplemental, educational workbooks that teach about animals in a fun way.

photo Regal Horned Lizard Phrynosoma solare
Regal Horned Lizard Phrynosoma solare

I love to talk about and share my reptiles with people and I hope my tales that weave science into animal escapades and picture books educate children and adults alike. Sometimes my message is subtle, such as in stories featuring curly-tail lizards and their environments and plights, and sometimes it’s more direct, such as in Silent Rocks about the disappearing rock iguanas on Cayman Brac.

photo Desert Cottontail Sylvilagus audubonii
Desert Cottontail Sylvilagus audubonii

While you are contemplating how you can help the endangered animals of the world, get outside and enjoy the wildlife in your neighborhood. With habitat loss and climate change, some may be more endangered than you realize.

photograph of tarantula
Tarantula, Aphonpelma chalcodes
photo Cooper's Hawk Accipiter cooperii
Cooper’s Hawk Accipiter cooperii

I hope you enjoy these pictures of some of my neighbors.

photo of two Great Horned Owl Bubo virginainus
A mating pair of Great Horned Owl, Bubo virginainus
photo Gopher Snake Pituophis melanoleucus
Gopher Snake Pituophis melanoleucus

If you want to read more about these Sonoran Desert critters, I suggest How Not to Photograph a Hummingbird, which is a fun story about the desert conspiring against a photographer—I just can’t help myself—I am, at heart, a murder-mystery writer. (It was a curly-tail lizard who started my career as a children’s science book writer.) I am still working on those murder-mysteries, however!

illustration of a hummingbird on a cactus
A Humorous Tale Introducing the Plants
and Animals of the Sonoran Desert
“I’ll have a long-term memory of this visit.
Maybe a permanent one.”
For All Ages
Reading Level Age 8+
26 pages
Glossary of Minerals, Flora and Fauna
Illustrated by Anderson Atlas
A bumbling visitor to Southern Arizona is repeatedly injured when trying to photograph a mischievous hummingbird, as the Sonoran Desert conspires against him.
Have a laugh while enjoying learning about the plants and animals of Southern Arizona.

There’s a glossary in the back of How Not to Photograph a Hummingbird with the scientific details about the mischievous conspirators. I love making science education fun!