Territorial!

photo of a patio with two lizards on it

Many animals (and some plants) establish territories. They protect these areas for their places to live, eat and mate. When I think of a territory, I usually imagine a natural area, but that’s not true for all lizards. Some lizards establish their territories on patios!

Several male Desert Spiny lizards, Sceloporus magister, have divvied up my patio, spacing their areas three to four feet apart. They respect each others’ space.

Don’t worry, I put out treats in all of their territories to encourage harmony. I’m happy to cede my patio to such wonderful lizards.

I enjoy writing about the animals in my life and have created a good number of children’s science education books that are fun to read. They are written in rhyme or as animal adventure tales–I believe fun reading makes the science stick. Looking for some fun science for your children? Check out my books on my Books page.

colorful children's book cover with a curly-tail lizard riding on the back of a hutia
This is a special story for readers who like to solve problems. It takes Curtis Curly-tail on his second adventure, but is based on real ecological events taking place on Warderick Wells Cay in The Bahamas. The hutia are endangered rodents native to the islands. Some are transplanted to Curtis’s cay, and Curtis meets his new friend, Horace. When the scientists come back to check on the hutia, they find that the native shrubs are almost gone, due to the hungry hutia. But Curtis and Horace do not understand what is happening when the hutia are captured and put into cages. Curtis decides to do everything he can to help Horace and his family. It is you, the reader, however, who must decide how the story will end. How do you solve a problem when an endangered species threatens a protected environment? There are three endings to the book. Which one will you choose? Or, will you come up with another solution? Lesson plans for teachers are also available at iginspired@gmail.com.

Share this post

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email
logo of Elaine A Powers

Click Image to Hear “Don’t Call Me Turtle!”

image of woman reading book at Tucson Botanical Gardens

TALES & TAILS CATEGORIES

Meet Curtis Curly-tail at You Tube!

Come hear life from a lizard's point of view!

FREE IDENTIFICATION BROCHURES

Brochure cover with illustration of a Rock Iguana

SAVING ENDANGERED SPECIES IS UP TO ALL OF US.

This free brochure teaches how to tell the difference between the endangered Rock Iguana and the invasive Green Iguana.
ALSO available: A brochure that shows the differences between Statia’s Iguana and the Green Iguana.
Use the Email Box on my Contact Page to contact me to obtain them.

Iguana Specialist Group

Image of Iguana faces with ISG

International Reptile Conservation Foundation

logo of IRCF

International Iguana Foundation

logo of Int'l Iguana Foundation, photo of iguana face